Important Italian Glass: The Primavera Collection 22 November 2016

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168

Archimede Seguso


A Piume vase

Vetreria Archimede Seguso
Italy, c. 1955
internally decorated glass
11¾ w x 3½ d x 16¼ h in (30 x 9 x 41 cm)

result: $106,250


estimate: $35,000–45,000

literature: Murano '900, Deboni, pg. 215, pl. 131 illustrates this example Vetri di Murano del '900 Capolavori, Deboni and Cocchi, pg. 83, pl. 36 illustrates this example

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Archimede Seguso

When people speak of the origins of studio art glass, they usually make reference to the American artist Harvey Littleton and his pioneering work at the Toledo Museum of Art in 1962.

Fewer people would think of Archimede Seguso in these terms, but a well founded argument could be made for exactly this—Archimede Seguso as the father of the world-wide studio art glass movement.

Beginning in 1946 Seguso, then considered the most accomplished master blower on Murano, opened his own firm, Vetreria Archimede Seguso.  Working with a small team, Seguso designed and executed almost every piece produced there for over forty years.  In addition, most of the pieces made by Seguso during these years were either unique or made in very limited numbers. Finally, the unparalleled artistry and technical virtuosity exhibited in these pieces is unrivaled and inimitable, even today.

The a Piume vessel and three Merletti vases presented here possess the highest level of quality and rarity and should rightly be considered early masterworks of studio art glass.