Property from Hillside House

The Home of Harold Price, Jr. and Carolyn Price


Frank Lloyd Wright would design not only the soaring Price Tower, but a number of homes for the Price family, including the home of Harold Charles Price, Jr., and his wife Carolyn, also in Bartlesville. Constructed at the same time as the Price Tower, the home embodied a similar architectural approach in its inclusion of cantilevered terraces, and abstracted organic references throughout. Wright placed the home as if it was emerging from one of the land’s rolling hills, thus earning the home its nickname Hillside, and making the connection between building and site even more evident. Like the Price Tower, a rich red color palette dominated the interior elements designed by Wright, including the dramatic wall divider. The Price family surrounded themselves with iconic designs of other modernist architects and furthered the connection to Wright and the southwest with the inclusion collection of pottery by noted Hope potters, Charles and Otellie Loloma.

Hans J. Wegner 1914–2007

Hans J. Wegner was born in Tønder, Denmark in 1914. As a teenager, Wegner apprenticed with master cabinetmaker H.F. Stahlberg before enrolling at the Danish School of Arts and Crafts in 1936. In 1940, Wegner teamed with Arne Jacobson and Erik Møller to design furniture for the newly built City Hall building in Aarhus, Denmark. In 1943, Wegner opened his own drafting studio. Wegner insisted on the highest standard of craftsmanship for his furniture, and his chairs often feature traditional mortise and tenon joints and unique materials such as paper cord.

Wegner’s famed China series (inspired by the imperial Chinese chairs from the Ming dynasty) was designed in 1949. That same year he introduce what is probably his most iconic seating design, The Chair at the Cabinetmakers Guild exhibition in Copenhagen. In 1951, his chairs were featured in the Museum of Modern Art’s famous Good Design exhibit. His chairs reached a national audience in 1960 when John F. Kennedy and Richard Nixon sat in them during the televised presidential debate. In 1971, Wegner was awarded the Diploma di Collaborazione at the Milano Triennale. Wegner created his innovative three-legged stacking chair known as the PP58 in 1988. In 1992, he retired from his firm and his daughter Marianne took over his practice. Wegner died in 2007.

In 2014, the Design Museum of Denmark honored Wegner with a retrospective of his work. Wegner’s furniture designs are held in the collections across the globe and can be found in the Museum of Modern Art, New York, the Victoria and Albert in London, and the Vitra Design Museum in Germany, among many others.

Learn More

Auction Results Hans J. Wegner

Evaluation of Property

Use this form to submit images and details for items that you would like to consign to auction. Need helpful tips?

  • Please be as descriptive as possible including details about an items condition and history.
  • Where did you get the piece and does it have a special provenance?
  • Do you know any details regarding the edition, vintage, designer, or other particulars?
hide

Catalog Added to Cart

This catalog has been added to your cart. Please checkout or continue browsing.

Checkout