The Collection of John M. Hall

John M. Hall was an architectural photographer for publications including New York Times Magazine, Elle Decor and Architectural Digest; he saw his work as "telling the story" of what architects built and his process was to "go from the overall to the the details," with a keen eye for the subtleties of line, form, light and shadow. Hall lived with art and design that reflected his refined sensibilities: simple, livable furniture by Eames, Knoll and Aalto, the clean lines and smooth surfaces of 1930s streamlined moderne lamps, china and glassware and minimalist works on paper by Robert Mangold and Richard Serra. Tucked into a small Manhattan apartment, Hall's collection shows the ease with which iconic 20th century designs were meant to be lived with.

John M. Hall photographed his apartment in the Flatiron district for an article highlighting
his collection in the June 1999 issue of House Beautiful

Hall grew up in North Carolina and studied architecture at North Carolina State University; he was also a ballet dancer and moved to New York in the mid-1970s to study at the American Ballet Theater School. In 1977, Hall relocated to Paris and worked as a model. It was during this time that he developed an interest in black and white photography. 

Thank God I missed post-modernism. I guess I'm just a classicist at heart. 
—John M. Hall

His structural, classical style was informed by photographers such as André Kertész and Walker Evans. Hall returned to New York in 1981 and began his career as an architectural photographer, with a particular interest in private gardens, Greek Revival and Biedermeier. He approached capturing these spaces as making "something that is more than just a document, [but] something that is visually exciting." 

The same is true of Hall's personal collection, with its attention to and exuberance for designs that are "clean and clear and simple as possible," while also still captivating. After Hall's passing in 2019, significant contributions from his collection were gifted to the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Yale University Art Gallery and his alma mater's Gregg Museum of Art and Design; the present selection of works celebrates Hall's sophisticated and gracious eye for design.

I'm not a design historian. I'm attracted to objects because I find them interesting and, yes, beautiful. And that's where this 20th-century sensibility started for me. There's just something so right about it.

John M. Hall

An Interview with John M. Hall

An interview with Hall from the 1980s shows him on location photographing a home and sharing his philosophies on design, architecture and photography.
 


Frank Lloyd Wright 1867–1959

During his seventy year career as an architect, Frank Lloyd Wright created more than 1,100 designs, half of which were realized and a large portion of which came about later in his life. Wright was born in Richland Center, Wisconsin in 1867. He enrolled at the University of Wisconsin in 1885 to study civil engineering, completing only two years of the program. After working for Joseph Silsbee on the construction of the Unity Chapel in Oak Park, Illinois Wright decided to pursue a career in architecture and he moved to Chicago where he began an apprenticeship at the famed architectural firm Adler and Sullivan, working directly with Louis Sullivan until 1893.

After parting ways, Wright moved to Oak Park. Working from his home studio, he developed a system of design developed from grid units and rooted in an appreciation of natural materials that would come to be known as the Prairie School of Architecture and would change the landscape of American design forever. Wright devoted himself to teaching and writing during the 1920s and 1930s. 1935 marked the beginning of an immense surge of creativity and productivity as he began work on his most celebrated residential design, Fallingwater. In the 1940s and 1950s Wright focused on his Usonian designs that reflected his belief in democratic architecture, offering middle-class residential options. In 1943, Wright took on his most demanding commission, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York. The museum, which would open its doors six months after his death in 1959, would be called his most significant work.

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Auction Results Frank Lloyd Wright

FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT, Kenneth Laurent House and Furnishings, Rockford | wright20.com

Frank Lloyd Wright

Kenneth Laurent House and Furnishings, Rockford
estimate: $500,000–700,000
result: $578,500

FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT, Rare floor lamp from the John Storer House, Hollywood | wright20.com

Frank Lloyd Wright

Rare floor lamp from the John Storer House, Hollywood
estimate: $50,000–70,000
result: $100,000

FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT, chair from the S.C. Johnson and Sons building, Racine, Wisconsin | wright20.com

Frank Lloyd Wright

chair from the S.C. Johnson and Sons building, Racine, Wisconsin
estimate: $60,000–70,000
result: $90,000

FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT, Executive armchair from Price Tower, Bartlesville, Oklahoma | wright20.com

Frank Lloyd Wright

Executive armchair from Price Tower, Bartlesville, Oklahoma
estimate: $20,000–30,000
result: $52,500

FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT, coffee table from the Auldbrass Plantation, Yemassee | wright20.com

Frank Lloyd Wright

coffee table from the Auldbrass Plantation, Yemassee
estimate: $20,000–30,000
result: $50,000

FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT, Presentation drawing for Price Tower, Bartlesville, Oklahoma | wright20.com

Frank Lloyd Wright

Presentation drawing for Price Tower, Bartlesville, Oklahoma
estimate: $20,000–30,000
result: $50,000

FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT, chair for the Larkin Administration Building in Buffalo, New York | wright20.com

Frank Lloyd Wright

chair for the Larkin Administration Building in Buffalo, New York
estimate: $45,000–55,000
result: $48,300

FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT, Hanging Lamp from the John Storer House, Hollywood | wright20.com

Frank Lloyd Wright

Hanging Lamp from the John Storer House, Hollywood
estimate: $30,000–50,000
result: $45,000

FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT, chair from the Imperial Hotel, Tokyo | wright20.com

Frank Lloyd Wright

chair from the Imperial Hotel, Tokyo
estimate: $20,000–30,000
result: $40,000

FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT, lounge chair from the Stanley Rosenbaum House, Florence, Alabama | wright20.com

Frank Lloyd Wright

lounge chair from the Stanley Rosenbaum House, Florence, Alabama
estimate: $10,000–15,000
result: $35,000

FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT, chair from the Johnson Wax building, Racine, Wisconsin | wright20.com

Frank Lloyd Wright

chair from the Johnson Wax building, Racine, Wisconsin
estimate: $30,000–50,000
result: $35,000

FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT, desk for The Price Tower, Bartlesville, Oklahoma | wright20.com

Frank Lloyd Wright

desk for The Price Tower, Bartlesville, Oklahoma
estimate: $30,000–40,000
result: $33,040

FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT, coffee table from Price Tower, Bartlesville, Oklahoma | wright20.com

Frank Lloyd Wright

coffee table from Price Tower, Bartlesville, Oklahoma
estimate: $10,000–15,000
result: $32,500

FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT, Barrel chair for the Herbert F. Johnson, Jr. residence, (Wingspread) | wright20.com

Frank Lloyd Wright

Barrel chair for the Herbert F. Johnson, Jr. residence, (Wingspread)
estimate: $30,000–40,000
result: $31,050

FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT, room screen | wright20.com

Frank Lloyd Wright

room screen
estimate: $30,000–50,000
result: $29,900

FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT, coffee table from Price Tower, Bartlesville, Oklahoma | wright20.com

Frank Lloyd Wright

coffee table from Price Tower, Bartlesville, Oklahoma
estimate: $7,000–9,000
result: $27,500

FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT, table from Price Tower, Bartlesville, Oklahoma | wright20.com

Frank Lloyd Wright

table from Price Tower, Bartlesville, Oklahoma
estimate: $8,000–10,000
result: $25,000

FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT, coffee table from Price Tower, Bartlesville, Oklahoma | wright20.com

Frank Lloyd Wright

coffee table from Price Tower, Bartlesville, Oklahoma
estimate: $5,000–7,000
result: $25,000

FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT, pair of lounge chairs from the Clarence Sondern House, Kansas City | wright20.com

Frank Lloyd Wright

pair of lounge chairs from the Clarence Sondern House, Kansas City
estimate: $20,000–30,000
result: $23,750

FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT, armchair for Price Tower, Bartlesville, Oklahoma | wright20.com

Frank Lloyd Wright

armchair for Price Tower, Bartlesville, Oklahoma
estimate: $10,000–15,000
result: $23,000

FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT, sectional sofa from the Sweeton House | wright20.com

Frank Lloyd Wright

sectional sofa from the Sweeton House
estimate: $5,000–7,000
result: $22,800

FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT, armchair from Price Tower, Bartlesville, Oklahoma | wright20.com

Frank Lloyd Wright

armchair from Price Tower, Bartlesville, Oklahoma
estimate: $20,000–30,000
result: $22,500

FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT, chair from the Paul J. and Ida Trier House, Des Moines, Iowa | wright20.com

Frank Lloyd Wright

chair from the Paul J. and Ida Trier House, Des Moines, Iowa
estimate: $15,000–20,000
result: $22,500

FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT, rare Executive Office chair from Price Tower, Bartlesville, Oklahoma | wright20.com

Frank Lloyd Wright

rare Executive Office chair from Price Tower, Bartlesville, Oklahoma
estimate: $20,000–30,000
result: $22,500