Danese: An Archetype

Designs from 1957–1978

The Italian firm Danese stands as one of the most influential companies in the history of design. Founded in 1957 by Bruno Danese and Jacqueline Vodoz, it was conceived to connect culture and industry and to bring art into the everyday.

Danese installation at a fair in Frankfurt Germany, c. 1973. Image via Danese Milano; Danese in Jack Lenor Larsen's shop, New York City, 1977. Image via Danese Milano

According to the company’s manifesto, their story “is a narration of material culture, suggested functions, discreet pedagogies and practical beauty.” With an emphasis on quality craftsmanship, forms born out of function and materiality, and details that are always essential, Danese is known around the globe for its production of timeless design, art and objects.

Danese’s success can largely be attributed to the philosophies and creations of Enzo Mari and Bruno Munari—Mari, known for asserting that “Form is everything” and his unwavering belief in the accessibility of good design, and Munari for his relentless experimentation with materials and technologies in the pursuit of new modes of visual communication. The result is an astonishing variety of products. From items for the home and office, to games, exhibitions, books and more, the two designers set the company on its course and established the quality and gold standard of Danese production.

By the 1970s, Danese achieved global recognition. The firm was participating in international fairs and exhibitions while opening stores and selling their product around the world, including the United States, France, Japan, etc. The firm paid great attention to the presentation and display of their product aligning themselves more closely with the world of art. And indeed Danese was in the business of selling works of art for the home and office. 

Over the years, many other influential designers—Angelo Mangiarotti, Claudio Boselli, Achille Castiglioni, Matali Crasset, Marco Ferreri, Naoto Fukasawa, Jonathan Olivares, Ron Gilad—would create for Danese, producing enduring and coveted objects for the use, enjoyment and benefit of all. 


Wright is honored to present the first auction dedicated to the influential production of Danese. The selection was amassed by a private European collector who acquired his first piece of Danese design in 1969 and proceeded on a global odyssey purchasing works from Danese stores as he traveled. Most works were obtained near their time of production, though a handful of select pieces were specially sought out and acquired later from private collections. Comprehensive in scope this exceptional collection traverses the first 20 years at Danese and the innovative, playful, and genuine designs of Enzo Mari and Bruno Munari.

This is a recognition of something belonging to art, but also of a quality to be found in things designed in the spirit of truth and made with love.

Vanni Pasca, Danese Catalog October 1990

Angelo Mangiarotti 1921–2012

Italian architect and designer Angelo Mangiarotti was known for applying a personal and humanistic approach to functional design. Born in Milan in 1921, he earned a degree in architecture from Milan Politecnico in 1948. Mangiarotti was fascinated by the methods and techniques employed in city-planning and architecture in addition to a passion for beauty and design. In 1953, while serving as a guest lecturer at the Institute of Design at the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago he made connections to Mies van der Rohe, Frank Lloyd Wright, and Walter Gropius.

Mangiarotti returned to Italy in 1955 establishing a firm with Bruno Morasutti, later opening his own firm in 1960. His inventive nature and craftsmanship was employed in numerous projects from marble bowls and glass collections for Knoll to urban planning and industrial design projects. In 1989, he established the Mangiarotti & Associates Office based in Tokyo, Japan. A highly regarded designer, Mangiarotti was presented with the Domus Formica award in 1956, the American Industrial Partners award for industrial construction works in 1972, the gold medal in architecture by the Accademia della Torre of Carrara in 1998, and a dedicated exhibition held at Calenzano's Design Museum in May 2010. Angelo Mangiarotti died in Milan in 2012.

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Upcoming Lots Angelo Mangiarotti

Auction Results Angelo Mangiarotti

ANGELO MANGIAROTTI, Equilibrio di una Relazione Vitale | wright20.com

Angelo Mangiarotti

Equilibrio di una Relazione Vitale

estimate: $20,000–30,000
result: $33,600
ANGELO MANGIAROTTI, dining table | wright20.com

Angelo Mangiarotti

dining table

estimate: $10,000–15,000
result: $32,500
ANGELO MANGIAROTTI, bronze vessels, set of six | wright20.com

Angelo Mangiarotti

bronze vessels, set of six

estimate: $15,000–20,000
result: $22,800
ANGELO MANGIAROTTI, dining table | wright20.com

Angelo Mangiarotti

dining table

estimate: $15,000–20,000
result: $20,400
ANGELO MANGIAROTTI, dining table | wright20.com

Angelo Mangiarotti

dining table

estimate: $9,000–12,000
result: $20,000
ANGELO MANGIAROTTI, Eros coffee table | wright20.com

Angelo Mangiarotti

Eros coffee table

estimate: $10,000–15,000
result: $19,200
ANGELO MANGIAROTTI, dining table from the Eros Collection | wright20.com

Angelo Mangiarotti

dining table from the Eros Collection

estimate: $5,000–7,000
result: $18,750
ANGELO MANGIAROTTI, Eros console | wright20.com

Angelo Mangiarotti

Eros console

estimate: $7,000–9,000
result: $18,000
ANGELO MANGIAROTTI, Eros console | wright20.com

Angelo Mangiarotti

Eros console

estimate: $9,000–12,000
result: $18,000
ANGELO MANGIAROTTI, dining table | wright20.com

Angelo Mangiarotti

dining table

estimate: $15,000–20,000
result: $17,500
ANGELO MANGIAROTTI, Idlor armchair, set of six | wright20.com

Angelo Mangiarotti

Idlor armchair, set of six

estimate: $5,000–7,000
result: $17,500
ANGELO MANGIAROTTI, Inca console | wright20.com

Angelo Mangiarotti

Inca console

estimate: $7,000–9,000
result: $17,500
ANGELO MANGIAROTTI, chandelier | wright20.com

Angelo Mangiarotti

chandelier

estimate: $7,000–9,000
result: $16,800
ANGELO MANGIAROTTI, vessels, set of six | wright20.com

Angelo Mangiarotti

vessels, set of six

estimate: $7,000–9,000
result: $15,600
ANGELO MANGIAROTTI, console from the Eros collection | wright20.com

Angelo Mangiarotti

console from the Eros collection

estimate: $5,000–7,000
result: $15,000
ANGELO MANGIAROTTI, Inca console | wright20.com

Angelo Mangiarotti

Inca console

estimate: $5,000–7,000
result: $15,000
ANGELO MANGIAROTTI, Eros side table | wright20.com

Angelo Mangiarotti

Eros side table

estimate: $5,000–7,000
result: $14,400
ANGELO MANGIAROTTI, Eros occasional table | wright20.com

Angelo Mangiarotti

Eros occasional table

estimate: $4,000–6,000
result: $14,400
ANGELO MANGIAROTTI, vase | wright20.com

Angelo Mangiarotti

vase

estimate: $1,500–2,000
result: $13,800
ANGELO MANGIAROTTI, coffee table | wright20.com

Angelo Mangiarotti

coffee table

estimate: $5,000–7,000
result: $11,875
ANGELO MANGIAROTTI, custom desk from the Eros collection | wright20.com

Angelo Mangiarotti

custom desk from the Eros collection

estimate: $10,000–15,000
result: $11,430
ANGELO MANGIAROTTI, planter | wright20.com

Angelo Mangiarotti

planter

estimate: $4,000–5,000
result: $11,400
ANGELO MANGIAROTTI, Eros occasional table | wright20.com

Angelo Mangiarotti

Eros occasional table

estimate: $5,000–7,000
result: $11,400
ANGELO MANGIAROTTI, Bilobato coffee table from the Eros collection | wright20.com

Angelo Mangiarotti

Bilobato coffee table from the Eros collection

estimate: $7,000–9,000
result: $11,400