Newsweek, 7 July 1969, cover
Time, 10 January 1969, pg. 41

A superb and extremely rare printing in the original square format of the Hasselblad frame of one of the most iconic photographs of the 20th century.

Anders took this fantastic photograph of the Earth (240,000 statute miles away) rising over the lunar horizon with the Hasselblad 500EL equipped with the 250mm telephoto lens and color magazine 14/D looking west across the western shore of Crater Pasteur on the lunar farside.

The rising Earth is about five degrees above the lunar horizon in this telephoto view taken from the Apollo 8 spacecraft near 110 degrees east longitude. The horizon, about 570 kilometers (350 statute miles) from the spacecraft, is near the eastern limb of the Moon as viewed from Earth. Width of the view at the horizon is about 150 kilometers (95 statute miles). On Earth the Sunset terminator crosses Africa. The South Pole is in the white area near the left end of the terminator. North and South America are under the clouds. The lunar surface has less pronounced color than indicated by this print. [NASA caption]

From the mission transcript (photograph taken T+075:48:39 GET after launch):

075:47:46 Anders:

Hand me that roll of color quick, will you...

075:47:48 Lovell:

Oh man, that’s great!

075:47:50 Anders:

...Hurry. Quick.

075:47:54 Borman:

Gee.

075:47:55 Lovell:

It’s down here?

075:47:56 Anders:

Just grab me a color. That color exterior.

075:48:00 Lovell:

[Garble].

075:48:01 Anders:

Hurry up!

075:48:06 Borman:

Got one?

075:48:08 Anders:

Yeah, I’m looking for one.

075:48:10 Lovell:

C 368. [Anders is handed color magazine 14/D; 368 refers to film type, SO-368, an Ektachrome-type transparency film manufactured by Kodak]

075:48:11 Anders:

Anything, quick.

075:48:13 Lovell:

Here.

075:48:17 Anders:

Well, I think we missed it.

075:48:31 Lovell:

Hey, I got it right here! [In the hatch window.]

075:48:33 Anders:

Let - let me get it out this window. It’s a lot clearer.

075:48:37 Lovell:

Bill, I got it framed; it’s very clear right here.