Happiness comes from correctness.

Angelo Mangiarotti

Curatorial Alchemy

Our paths first crossed, unknown until many years later, at an intimate yet bustling wedding reception in a south Chicago apartment. This was probably 30 years ago, perhaps even the same year a new gallery, Torno Wright, opened at the end of my street to a fanfare of Eames, heralding new changes to come. Criss-crossing breezes of chance encounters, meandering spirits, hazy focus of time and space, of enthusiasm and knowledge sought, now united again in the same city.

That same serendipity, prompting impulse and discovery, guided welcome reward in the crucible of that great industrial city, still littered with the artefacts of the American mid-century. It was within this uneven yet fertile terrain, hidden slightly below surface, that Patrick’s intuitive talent—honed first as photographer then embellished as artist—would treasure the valuable neglected as passionate collector, and then as the inspirational dealer that I was to meet again, years later in New York City.

If asked to select one word to describe Patrick, I would resist and pick two. The first would be curiosity—a fundamental essential, to stimulate inquiry and rigour in all things, both great and small, of any era or region, type or surface. Even the most fleeting survey of this selection for sale is a celebration of innovation and of inspiration—an unerring eye for the unusually exceptional, or perhaps the exceptionally unusual. The chances are, that these are indeed discoveries that you have not yet realized that you needed to make.

Mentor, would be my second word. If artefacts and objects articulate visual, cultural and historic language, then the fluency of skillful mentorship—to guide, nurture, describe and explain—releases the eloquence of murmuring histories. In this capacity Patrick is that most earnest and sincere of excellent narrators. If ever I had friends, clients or colleagues visiting New York looking for unusual inspiration, there was always the certainty that Patrick’s gallery would offer them a glimpse of the hitherto unseen or the unusually seductive, always with the reassurance of the most fascinating story waiting to be told.

Mentorship and curiosity, when balanced in equal measure, reveal the precious alchemy of a curator. And it is the duty of the mature curator to discern and detect, to cultivate change, and from there to pioneer, and to share. Innovation is never static, and the Present is already the Future. Fresh dialogs evolve, energies to be nurtured, opportunities to be guided. Renewed and re-orientated, Patrick now faces fully forward—as benefactor, interlocutor and mentor to a new, inquisitive generation of talented creators, and the quest for discovery rejuvenates.

— Simon Andrews
andrewsartadvisory.com

Angelo Mangiarotti 1921–2012

Italian architect and designer Angelo Mangiarotti was known for applying a personal and humanistic approach to functional design. Born in Milan in 1921, he earned a degree in architecture from Milan Politecnico in 1948. Mangiarotti was fascinated by the methods and techniques employed in city-planning and architecture in addition to a passion for beauty and design. In 1953, while serving as a guest lecturer at the Institute of Design at the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago he made connections to Mies van der Rohe, Frank Lloyd Wright, and Walter Gropius.

Mangiarotti returned to Italy in 1955 establishing a firm with Bruno Morasutti, later opening his own firm in 1960. His inventive nature and craftsmanship was employed in numerous projects from marble bowls and glass collections for Knoll to urban planning and industrial design projects. In 1989, he established the Mangiarotti & Associates Office based in Tokyo, Japan. A highly regarded designer, Mangiarotti was presented with the Domus Formica award in 1956, the American Industrial Partners award for industrial construction works in 1972, the gold medal in architecture by the Accademia della Torre of Carrara in 1998, and a dedicated exhibition held at Calenzano's Design Museum in May 2010. Angelo Mangiarotti died in Milan in 2012.

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Auction Results Angelo Mangiarotti

ANGELO MANGIAROTTI, Equilibrio di una Relazione Vitale | wright20.com

Angelo Mangiarotti

Equilibrio di una Relazione Vitale

estimate: $20,000–30,000
result: $33,600
ANGELO MANGIAROTTI, dining table | wright20.com

Angelo Mangiarotti

dining table

estimate: $10,000–15,000
result: $32,500
ANGELO MANGIAROTTI, bronze vessels, set of six | wright20.com

Angelo Mangiarotti

bronze vessels, set of six

estimate: $15,000–20,000
result: $22,800
ANGELO MANGIAROTTI, dining table | wright20.com

Angelo Mangiarotti

dining table

estimate: $15,000–20,000
result: $20,400
ANGELO MANGIAROTTI, dining table | wright20.com

Angelo Mangiarotti

dining table

estimate: $9,000–12,000
result: $20,000
ANGELO MANGIAROTTI, Eros coffee table | wright20.com

Angelo Mangiarotti

Eros coffee table

estimate: $10,000–15,000
result: $19,200
ANGELO MANGIAROTTI, dining table from the Eros Collection | wright20.com

Angelo Mangiarotti

dining table from the Eros Collection

estimate: $5,000–7,000
result: $18,750
ANGELO MANGIAROTTI, Eros console | wright20.com

Angelo Mangiarotti

Eros console

estimate: $7,000–9,000
result: $18,000
ANGELO MANGIAROTTI, Eros console | wright20.com

Angelo Mangiarotti

Eros console

estimate: $9,000–12,000
result: $18,000
ANGELO MANGIAROTTI, dining table | wright20.com

Angelo Mangiarotti

dining table

estimate: $15,000–20,000
result: $17,500
ANGELO MANGIAROTTI, Idlor armchair, set of six | wright20.com

Angelo Mangiarotti

Idlor armchair, set of six

estimate: $5,000–7,000
result: $17,500
ANGELO MANGIAROTTI, Inca console | wright20.com

Angelo Mangiarotti

Inca console

estimate: $7,000–9,000
result: $17,500
ANGELO MANGIAROTTI, chandelier | wright20.com

Angelo Mangiarotti

chandelier

estimate: $7,000–9,000
result: $16,800
ANGELO MANGIAROTTI, vessels, set of six | wright20.com

Angelo Mangiarotti

vessels, set of six

estimate: $7,000–9,000
result: $15,600
ANGELO MANGIAROTTI, console from the Eros collection | wright20.com

Angelo Mangiarotti

console from the Eros collection

estimate: $5,000–7,000
result: $15,000
ANGELO MANGIAROTTI, Inca console | wright20.com

Angelo Mangiarotti

Inca console

estimate: $5,000–7,000
result: $15,000
ANGELO MANGIAROTTI, Eros side table | wright20.com

Angelo Mangiarotti

Eros side table

estimate: $5,000–7,000
result: $14,400
ANGELO MANGIAROTTI, Eros occasional table | wright20.com

Angelo Mangiarotti

Eros occasional table

estimate: $4,000–6,000
result: $14,400
ANGELO MANGIAROTTI, vase | wright20.com

Angelo Mangiarotti

vase

estimate: $1,500–2,000
result: $13,800
ANGELO MANGIAROTTI, coffee table | wright20.com

Angelo Mangiarotti

coffee table

estimate: $5,000–7,000
result: $11,875
ANGELO MANGIAROTTI, custom desk from the Eros collection | wright20.com

Angelo Mangiarotti

custom desk from the Eros collection

estimate: $10,000–15,000
result: $11,430
ANGELO MANGIAROTTI, planter | wright20.com

Angelo Mangiarotti

planter

estimate: $4,000–5,000
result: $11,400
ANGELO MANGIAROTTI, Eros occasional table | wright20.com

Angelo Mangiarotti

Eros occasional table

estimate: $5,000–7,000
result: $11,400
ANGELO MANGIAROTTI, Bilobato coffee table from the Eros collection | wright20.com

Angelo Mangiarotti

Bilobato coffee table from the Eros collection

estimate: $7,000–9,000
result: $11,400